Saturday, November 29, 2014

Odds and Ends


From Clark, Histories of Several Regiments and Battalions . . .

I plan to slow down my (already slow) blogging over the next few months to devote a little more time to research and writing.  I'm currently in the early stages of a project involving the Confederate operations in 1864 to recapture key positions in eastern North Carolina.

For now, here are a two posts I've been meaning to put up recently:

 
Tour of Grant's Sixth Offensive at Pamplin Park:   

On Friday, October 17, I had the great fortune to conduct a tour with Will Greene down at Pamplin Historical Park as part of the 18th Annual Symposium there.  We covered Grant's Sixth Offensive at Petersburg, the main subject of my book Richmond Must Fall. Will Greene possesses a vast knowledge of the Petersburg Campaign and it was a great to see him in action on the tour. We enjoyed the rare opportunity to visit some of the key sites involving the operations on October 27, 1864 and were able to share the day with a bus full of friendly, highly knowledgeable, and engaged companions.     


Journal of Southern History:  Review of Richmond Must Fall 

The August issue of The Journal of Southern History has a nice review of Richmond Must Fall  by Robert R. Mackey author of The UnCivil War: Irregular Warfare in the Upper South, 1861-1865 (OU Press, 2004).  This review, published in one of the most highly-regarded journals in the field, was great to see.  Here are a few excerpts.

"Newsome's clear prose and organization, which make a fairly complex series of battles into a logical, effective, and highly readable tome, are the highlight of the work. . . . Overall, Newsome has added to the growing body of knowledge of the Civil War by covering in detail this important but often forgotten campaign in the fall of 1864. The author's extensive use of source materials is impressive and should be a model for other scholars in the field, and his adroit use of first-person accounts is excellent." - Robert R. Mackey, The Journal of Southern History